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The Effect of Thermal-Mechanical Treatments on the Structure and Properties of Refractory Metals

  • Roger A. Perkins

Abstract

The control of properties by thermal-mechanical treatments is based on mechanical deformation and annealing according to a schedule that will produce a unique and stable combination of grain structure, dislocation substructure, texture, and dispersion of precipitated phases. The formation and stabilization of deformation substructures in Cb, Ta, Mo, W, and their alloys is reviewed. The effect of thermal-mechanical treatments on grain structure and texture also is considered. Examples are given to illustrate how the ductile-to-brittle transition behavior, low temperature strength and ductility, high temperature strength, creep resistance, and formability are affected by the structural changes that can be produced. Most of the results obtained to date indicate considerable promise for major advances in refractory metal technology by the application of thermal-mechanical treatments. The challenge for the future is to relate the basic concepts and understanding of the control of structure and properties to the metal working processes required to produce metals in appropriate shapes or forms.

Keywords

Dislocation Density Flow Stress Creep Rate Refractory Metal Dislocation Substructure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petrolium Engineers, Inc. 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roger A. Perkins
    • 1
  1. 1.Lockheed Palo Alto Research LaboratoryLockheed Missiles & Space CompanyPalo AltoUSA

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