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The Fate of Intratracheal 14C-Guanidinated Pancreatic Elastase in Hamster Lung

  • P. J. Stone
  • V. Pereira
  • D. Biles
  • G. L. Snider
  • H. M. Kagan
  • C. Franzblau
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 79)

Abstract

Native pancreatic elastase and guanidinated elastase have similar in vitro and in vivo properties and produce emphysema of similar severity in hamsters. 14C-guanidina-ted pancreatic elastase (16,000 cpm/0.2 mg) was instilled into the trachea of anesthetized hamsters. Within 24 hours the radiolabel found in the lungs rapidly decreases to 12% of the original 16,000 cpm and to 1% after 96 hours. Most of the radiolabel and elastase activity found in the lungs can be removed by bronchopulmonary lavage up to 48 hours after instillation. Although seemingly very small, there is a significant amount of radiolabel (1–2%) which cannot be removed from the lungs by extensive bronchopulmonary lavage.

Keywords

Intratracheal Instillation Elastase Activity Elastase Inhibitor Pancreatic Elastase Porcine Pancreatic Elastase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. J. Stone
    • 1
    • 2
  • V. Pereira
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. Biles
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. L. Snider
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. M. Kagan
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. Franzblau
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and MedicineBoston University School of MedicineBostonUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Biochemistry and MedicineBoston Veterans Administration HospitalBostonUSA

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