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Use of Microscopy in Failure Analysis

  • Iain Le May

Abstract

Microscopy is one of the basic tools employed in conducting a failure analysis, its purpose being to examine fracture surfaces (the science of fractography) to determine their morphology and, hence, the mechanisms of fracture. In addition, it is used to examine the microstructure of failed components to determine the phases present, heat treatment, and processing history, as well as the path of the primary and any secondary cracks. Thus, microscopic examination can provide information pinpointing the origin, the path, and the nature of the fracture and whether improper processing, for example, contributed to it.

Keywords

Fracture Surface Austenitic Stainless Steel Ductile Fracture Failure Analysis Hydrogen Embrittlement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Inc. 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Iain Le May
    • 1
  1. 1.Metallurgical Consulting Services Ltd.USA

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