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Microscopy and the Development of Free-Machining Steels

  • J. D. Watson

Abstract

Machinability has been studied by engineers for over 75 years, beginning with the significant contributions of F. W. Taylor between 1881 and 1906.1 Since then, the mechanics of metal cutting has been extensively studied, and considerable progress has been made in developing theories of machinability based on a knowledge of mechanical properties.2 Scientists, and, in particular, metallurgists, have only more recently contributed to this understanding because for many years following Taylor’s pioneering work, machinability drew little or no attention from the many eminent metallurgists of the time, and free-machining steels per se were unrecognized.3

Keywords

Nonmetallic Inclusion Rake Face Metal Cutting Sulfide Inclusion Manganese Sulfide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Inc. 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. D. Watson
    • 1
  1. 1.The Broken Hill Proprietary Company Ltd.VictoriaAustralia

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