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Trace Reflex Formation in Senescence and Senility

  • L. Solyom
  • T. Crowell

Abstract

Conditionability of the brain-damaged patient, measured on skeleto-muscular and autonomic conditioned responses, was shown to be greatly reduced in comparison with the conditionability of patients suffering from psychogenic disturbances [11, 12, 21]. A decrease in conditionability with age was also demonstrated utilizing the galvanic skin response (GSR) [3] and the conditioned-eyelid method [4], In order to assess the relative contributions of age. and brain damage on the decrease in conditionability of senile, brain-damaged individuals, we compared their results with those of senescent individuals [22].

Keywords

Conditioned Stimulus Unconditioned Stimulus Conditioned Response Galvanic Skin Response Senile Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Solyom
  • T. Crowell

There are no affiliations available

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