Coded Stimulation of the Eighth Nerve as a Means of Investigating Auditory Memory

  • B. Saltzberg
  • R. G. Heath
  • C. M. Fortner
  • R. J. Edwards


This report describes an approach underway in our laboratories to test one aspect of the complex function of memory storage. In the process of learning, meaningful sensory signals are perceived and stored for later recall, and thus become memories. As a result of the presence of this stored information, later incoming sensory signals when properly perceived have rather specific meaning. In the preliminary work to be presented today, we will describe our endeavors to determine how the energy in one specific sensory stimulus (the auditory signal) is coded so that it carries the necessary information to the auditory cortex. Coded electrical stimulation which simulates auditory stimulation is used to excite the auditory pathway at certain levels in an attempt to achieve neural transmission over subsequent auditory pathways within the brain. The experimental criterion for successful electrical coding will be based on a comparison of the average evoked response due to electrical stimulation with the average evoked response due to acoustic stimulation.


Electrical Stimulation Pulse Train Auditory Cortex Electrical Pulse Auditory Nerve 


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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Saltzberg
  • R. G. Heath
  • C. M. Fortner
  • R. J. Edwards

There are no affiliations available

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