Advertisement

Quantitative Aspects of the Nonspecific Humoral Immune Response to Sheep Erythrocytes

  • R. Benner
  • A.-M. Rijnbeek
  • A. van Oudenaren
  • A. Coutinho
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 149)

Summary

The kinetics and magnitude of the nonspecific humoral immune response was studied at the cellular level in mice immunized with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). Intravenous injection of the antigen evoked, in addition to a specific anti-SRBC response, a nonspecific response of all immunoglobulin (Ig) classes and subclasses. This nonspecific response peaked on day 4 or 5 after immunization, irrespective of the Ig class. The absolute number of nonspecific Ig-secreting cells induced by immunization varied with the different Ig-classes, and it was not proportional to the background level of Ig-secreting cells of the various classes. The nonspecific IgM-IgG1- and IgG2-response was 3 to 4 times as large as the antigen-specific responses of these classes. The nonspecific IgA-response, however, was many times greater.

Keywords

Nude Mouse Plaque Assay Athymic Nude Mouse Sheep Erythrocyte Primary Immunization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    G. Urbain-Vansanten. Immunology 19:783 (1970).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    E.J. Moticka. Immunology 27:401 (1974).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    K. Pachmann, D. Killander, and H. Wigzell. Eur. J. Immunol. 4:138 (1974).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    W.C. Boyd, and H. Bernard. J. Immunol. 33:111 (1937).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    P.A. Cazenave, T. Temynck, and S. Avrameas. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 71:4500 (1974).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    J.C. Antoine, and S. Avrameas. Immunology 30:573 (1976).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    J.C. Antoine, C. Bleux, S. Avrameas, and P. Liacopoulos. Nature 277:218 (1979).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Y.J. Rosenberg, and J.M. Chiller. J. Exp. Med. 150:517 (1979).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    R. Benner, F. Meima, CM. van der Meulen, and W.B. van Muiswinkel. Immunology 26:247 (1974).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    R. Benner, A.-M. Rijnbeek, R.R. Bernabe, C. Martinex-Alonso, and A. Coutinho. Immunobiol. 158:225 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    C. Carelli, J.-C. Antoine, C. Petit, M. Rodrigot, and S. Avrameas. J. Immunol. 121:2070 (1978).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    C. Carobel, F. Nau, and J.M. Dubert. Immunology 40:613 (1980).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    R. Benner, F. Meima, G.M. van der Meulen, and W. van Ewijk. Immunology 27:747 (1974).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    A. Coutinho, and L. Forni. Immunobiol. 158:182 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    A. Coutinho, L. Forni, and R.R. Bernabe. Springer Sem. Immunopath. 3:171 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Benner
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • A.-M. Rijnbeek
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. van Oudenaren
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. Coutinho
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Dept. of Cell Biology & GeneticsErasmus UniversityRotterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Basel Institute for ImmunologyBaselSwitzerland
  3. 3.Dept. of ImmunologyUniversity of UmeaUmeaSweden

Personalised recommendations