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The Effect of Veiled Cells on Lymphocyte Function

  • Brigid Balfour
  • Jacqueline A. O’Brien
  • M. Perera
  • J. Clarke
  • Tatjana Sumerska
  • Stella C. Knight
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 149)

Abstract

The afferent lymph supply is essential for the proper functioning of the lymph node. Ablation of the afferent vessels leads to the disappearance of macrophages, interdigitating cells, plasma cells, germinal centres and high endothelial venules (1,2). The majority of T and B lymphocytes enter the node via the blood vessels, but this route is not used by the accessory cells, many of which are derived from precursors in the afferent lymph (3). The lymph contains large cells with actively moving cytoplasmic extensions, or veils. Cells of this type are not found in the efferent or thoracic duct lymph and appear to end their journey in the paracortex, or T-dependent area of the lymph node (4), where they may differentiate into interdigitating cells. Actively phagocytic cells form only 20% of veiled cells and 98% are strongly la-positive (3,5).

Keywords

Accessory Cell Resident Macrophage Lymphocyte Function Thymidine Uptake High Endothelial Venule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brigid Balfour
    • 1
  • Jacqueline A. O’Brien
    • 1
  • M. Perera
    • 1
  • J. Clarke
    • 1
  • Tatjana Sumerska
    • 1
  • Stella C. Knight
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinical Research CentreHarrow, MiddlesexEngland

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