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Antigens Associated with Bursal and Thymic Reticular Epithelial Cells

  • I. G. Barr
  • M. R. Alderton
  • J. L. Brumley
  • R. L. Boyd
  • H. K. Muller
  • H. A. Ward
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 149)

Abstract

There is evidence of a role for thymic reticulum cells and epithelium in mammalian T lymphocyte differentiation (1,2) and we have previously shown (3) that chicken thymic and bursal reticular epithelial (REp) cells are able to induce in vitro the appearance of T and B lymphocyte surface markers, respectively, on embryonic precursor cells. In addition, bursa-derived factor(s) have been shown to influence B cell development (4,5). Chicken thymus REp cells have specific characteristics (6,7) and we have demonstrated (8) the antigenic specificity of the bursal reticulin framework associated with the cortico-medullary junction and the cortex. Thus, considerable evidence points to the specificity of reticular-and epithelial-type cells of primary lymphoid organs and to a role of these cells in lymphocyte differentiation. With a view to characterizing and investigating the function of avian REp cells and associated structures xenoantisera have been produced which have enabled the detection of a number of antigens.

Keywords

Lymphocyte Differentiation Follicle Formation Corticomedullary Junction Primary Lymphoid Organ Animal Health Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. G. Barr
    • 1
  • M. R. Alderton
    • 1
  • J. L. Brumley
  • R. L. Boyd
    • 1
  • H. K. Muller
    • 1
  • H. A. Ward
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pathology and ImmunologyMonash University Medical SchoolMelbourneAustralia

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