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Disparity between Humoral Antibody Formation and Proliferative Reactions in Lymph Nodes: C57L/J vs. Haired and Hairless HRS/J MICE

  • Max W. Hess
  • Heinz Buerki
  • Jean Laissue
  • Hans Cottier
  • Richard D. Stoner
  • Hans-Juerg Heiniger
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 149)

Abstract

The three genotypes of HRS/J strain mice, +/+, hr/+, and hr/hr, differ only with respect to the mutant locus on chromosome 14 (hr for “hairless”) or a region closely linked to it1. Homozygous hairless” (hr/hr) mice develop a severe thymic atrophy which sets in at the age of approximately 6 months, concomitant with deficient immune responses to certain antigens2. The derangement underlying the immunodeficiency of mice which carry the hr gene includes a disproportionate distribution of T-cell subpopulations: a decrease in the number of Ly-1 and a parallel increase in the number of Ly-123 cells became noticeable in hr/hr mice at the age of 3 months and in hr/+ animals between 7 to 10 months of age3.

Keywords

Germinal Center Tetanus Toxoid Popliteal Lymph Node Aluminum Phosphate Germinal Center Formation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Max W. Hess
    • 1
  • Heinz Buerki
    • 1
  • Jean Laissue
    • 1
  • Hans Cottier
    • 1
  • Richard D. Stoner
    • 2
  • Hans-Juerg Heiniger
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of PathologyUniversity of BernSwitzerland
  2. 2.Medical DepartmentBNLUptonUSA
  3. 3.Jackson LaboratoryBar HarborUSA

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