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Dendritic Reticulum Cell Sarcoma: A Rare Tumor of the Follicular Compartment

  • P. van der Valk
  • J. te Velde
  • P. J. Spaander
  • G. J. den Ottolander
  • D. J. Ruiter
  • C. J. L. M. Meijer
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 149)

Abstract

Recent developments in immunology have revealed that non-Hodgkin lymphomas may be considered as neoplastic counterparts of the reactions that normally take place after antigenic challenge in special compartments of the lymph nodes. For instance, the relationship between the follicular compartment and follicle centre cell tumors has been demonstrated clearly in the literature (Lukes and Collins, 1973; Lennert, 1973; Lennert, 1978a). Three types of cells are present in the follicular compartment: lymphoid cells, macrophages and dendritic reticulum cells (DRC). Thus theoretically three types of “lymphomas” arising from the follicular compartment are possible, i.e. follicle centre cell lymphomas originating from the lymphoid cells, histiocytic sarcoma or true histiocytic lymphomas arising from the histiocytic reticulum cell, and dendritic reticulum cell sarcoma, a tumor in which the neoplastic cell is a DRC (Lennert, 1978b). In a tumor of one of the cell types the other 2 types of cells can also be found among the tumor cells.

Keywords

Lymphoid Cell Adenosine Triphosphatase Enzyme Histochemistry Histiocytic Sarcoma Dendritic Reticulum Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. van der Valk
  • J. te Velde
    • 1
  • P. J. Spaander
    • 1
  • G. J. den Ottolander
    • 2
  • D. J. Ruiter
    • 1
  • C. J. L. M. Meijer
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PathologyUniversity Medical CentreLeidenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity Medical CentreLeidenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.S.S.D.Z.DelftThe Netherlands

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