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Expression of the WE3 Antigen in the Newt Wound Epithelium

  • Roy A. Tassava
  • Bruce L. Tomlinson
  • David J. Goldhamer
  • Noorullah Akhtar
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 172)

Summary

mAb WE3 identifies an antigen abundant in wound epithelium but virtually absent from skin epidermis. The antigen is developmentally expressed, being absent from the initial wound epithelium but appearing by the 2nd week after amputation. The present study was designed to investigate the origin of WE3 reactive wound epithelial cells. The results are consistent with the view that skin epidermal cells migrate over the amputation surface and subsequently express the WE3 antigen. WE3 reactive wound epithelial cells do not appear to originate from integumentary glands or “ovoid” cells of skin epidermis.

Keywords

Wound Epithelium Cell Cycle Activity Wound Epithelial Cell Ovoid Cell Skin Gland 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Literature cited

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roy A. Tassava
    • 1
  • Bruce L. Tomlinson
    • 1
  • David J. Goldhamer
    • 1
  • Noorullah Akhtar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular GeneticsThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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