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Elastic Properties Related to Depth of Burial, Strontium Content and Age, and Diagenetic Stage in Pelagic Carbonate Sediments

  • Murli H. Manghnani
  • Seymour O. Schlanger
  • Phillip D. Milholland
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 5)

Abstract

Laboratory measurements of density (p), compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) velocities, and velocity anisotropies (Ap) and (As) in a pelagic ooze-chalk-limestone sequence from DSDP Site 289 are viewed in light of its present depth of burial, sediment age and diagenetic stage.

Changes in the elastic properties with increasing depth are more or less systematic; in general, p, Vp, Vs, Ap and As increase and a decreases. In certain cases, the depths at which large variations are noted correlate well with the interpreted depths of acoustic reflectors.

The changes in elastic properties with depth are gradational from ooze to chalk, and chalk to limestone. Chert and siliceous limestones do not exhibit uniform properties as a function of depth.

Sr content of pelagic carbonates varies inversely with sediment age. It is shown that in addition to the present depth of burial the sediment age is a useful parameter for proposing geoacoustic models of the pelagic carbonate sequences.

Keywords

Carbonate Sediment Calcite Cement Geophysical Parameter Velocity Anisotropy Diagenetic Stage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Murli H. Manghnani
    • 1
  • Seymour O. Schlanger
    • 1
  • Phillip D. Milholland
    • 1
  1. 1.Hawaii Institute of GeophysicsUniversity of HawaiiHonoluluUSA

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