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The Effect of Short Experiences on Macromolecules in the Brain

  • E. Glassman
  • J. E. Wilson

Abstract

There is much research that suggests that the storage of memory involves successive stages. Initially, memory is presumed to be retrievable from a short-lived form, short term memory, but as this declines, memory is then retrievable from a more permanent form, long term memory (see John, 1967, and others for a discussion of the evidence for this). These steps in the learning process and memory storage are shown in Fig. 1.

Keywords

Conditioned Stimulus Term Memory Memory Consolidation Training Experience Chemical Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Glassman
    • 1
  • J. E. Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and the Neurobiology ProgramThe University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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