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Implication of Transglutaminase in Mitogen-Induced Human Lymphocyte Blast Transformation

  • S. Metafora
  • G. Peluso
  • G. Ravagnan
  • A. Fusco
  • V. Gentile
  • R. Porta
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (NATO ASI F, volume 231)

Abstract

Lymphocytes are unique cells evolved to guard, in collaboration with other accessory cells (such as macrophages), the selfness of vertebrate organisms against the invasiveness of alien elements or macromolecules. Recognition of intruders is obtained either by cell-cell or cell-molecule interactions, in which sophisticated biochemical machineries, endowed in the lymphocyte plasma membrane, are set in action as important parts of defence mechanisms used by singles to defend their own individualities. As a consequence of the activity of all these surface molecular devices, a metabolic turmoil is triggered in these cells. Numerous intra- and extra-cellular biochemical signals are released, bringing about in a short time marked modifications of a number of important metabolic pathways such as those related to: 1) energy production; 2) control of electrolyte traffic in the cell; 3) transcription and translation of specific messenger RNA; 4) biosynthesis of tRNA and rRNA; 5) control of DNA replication and cell division1–10.

Keywords

Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Plasma Membrane Protein Complete RPMI Medium TGase Activity Human Peripheral Blood Monocyte 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Metafora
    • 1
  • G. Peluso
    • 1
  • G. Ravagnan
    • 2
  • A. Fusco
    • 3
  • V. Gentile
    • 3
  • R. Porta
    • 3
  1. 1.CNR Inst. Prot. Biochem. Enzymol.Arco Felice, NaplesItaly
  2. 2.CNR Inst. Exptl. MedicineRomeItaly
  3. 3.Inst. Chem. and Biol. Chem., 1st Med. SchoolUniv. of NaplesNaplesItaly

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