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Evoked Potentials in Multiple Sclerosis and Optic Neuritis

  • Keith H. Chiappa
Part of the Topics in Neurosurgery book series (TINS, volume 2)

Abstract

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the CNS characterized by foci of myelin destruction with relative preservation of axons and nerve cell bodies. Central myelin is formed by extensions of the cytoplasmic membrane of oligodendrocytes which wrap around the axon, resulting in concentric layers of lipid and protein. The acute MS plaque shows myelin breakdown and inflammation with perivenous infiltrates of mononuclear cells and lymphocytes; older lesions contain microglial phagocytes and reactive astrocytes. Inactive lesions (sclerotic plaques) contain relatively acellular fibroglial tissue (gliosis) and show loss of axis cylinders [53]. The pathogenesis of MS is unknown although this is a very active research area [62].

Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Optic Nerve Optic Neuritis Trigeminal Neuralgia Magnetie Resonanee Imaging 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston 1989

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  • Keith H. Chiappa

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