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Controls in Solar Energy Systems

  • C. Byron Winn

Abstract

The characteristics of bang-bang, proportional, integral, derivative, and PID controllers, and their applications to solar energy systems, are presented. Also included is a determination of the effects of temperature settings on cycling rates in systems using bang-bang controllers. A phase-plane representation is developed and an analytical representation for the number of cycles as a function of temperature settings, solar radiation, and physical parameters is presented.

Proportional and optimal control of mass flow rate in both low and high temperature applications is described. Examples are presented.

Finally, conventional, Proportional, and optimal controllers for off-peak storage systems are described. This analysis includes the electric utility in the system models.

Keywords

Mass Flow Rate Optimal Controller Thermal Capacitance Solar Energy System Parasitic Loss 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© American Solar Energy Society, Inc. 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Byron Winn
    • 1
  1. 1.Colorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA

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