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Passive Solar Heating Research

  • J. Douglas Balcomb

Abstract

Key elements of research into the passive solar heating of buildings are described and examples are given to illustrate how research in the field has been approached. The major emphasis of the research has been on devising mathematical models to characterize heat flow within buildings, on the validation of these models by comparison with test results, and on the subsequent use of the models to investigate both the influence of various design parameters and the weather on system performance. Results from both test modules and monitored buildings are given. Simulation analysis and the development of simplified methods are described.

Keywords

Heat Pipe Test Room Selective Surface Direct Gain Thermal Network 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© American Solar Energy Society, Inc. 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Douglas Balcomb
    • 1
  1. 1.Los Alamos National LaboratoryLos AlamosUSA

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