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Wood Composites

  • Robert H. Gillespie
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 3)

Abstract

Wood composites consist of various kinds of wood elements bonded together in different combinations and configurations. The elements may be fibers, particles, flakes, wafers, strands, veneers, or sawn lumber from a wood resource. These elements may be combined with metal foils, plastic films or foams, or a variety of other materials to achieve some specific performance requirement. The different wood elements can also be combined in various ways to provide the properties desired for a particular end use.

Keywords

Shear Strength Internal Bond Strength Wood Composite Durability Property Forest Product Laboratory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert H. Gillespie
    • 1
  1. 1.Forest Products LaboratoryMadisonUSA

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