Advertisement

Urolithiasis pp 401-409 | Cite as

Crystal Growth and Aggregation of Calcium Oxalate in High Ionic Strength Solutions

  • H. Füredi-Milhofer
  • D. Skrtić
  • M. Marković
  • Lj. Komunjer

Abstract

According to the hyperexcretion-supersaturation theory1, the concentrations of ions in urines of calcium oxalate stone formers persistently exceed the formation product of this salt, and, as a consequence, calcium oxalate crystals are produced by spontaneous nucleation, growth and aggregation. Some of the crystals, or aggregates, are eventually trapped in the kidney and become the nidus for a stone. It has been proposed2,3 that urines of normal individuals contain inhibitors of crystal growth and aggregation which are decreased or absent in stone formers. Accordingly, much effort has been spent to test potential inhibitors, but most models permit only the measurement of an overall effect, without separating the two precipitation processes. In this study a model system is presented by which the kinetics of crystal growth and aggregation can be followed subsequently and independently in systems in which both processes proceed simultaneously. Quantitative estimates of the rates of crystal growth and aggregation of calcium oxalate from high ionic strength solutions, such as prevail in crystalluria, are given. The proposed model makes it possible to study the effect of inhibitors on both processes simultaneously and independently in the course of spontaneous precipitation.

Keywords

Crystal Growth Calcium Oxalate Kinetic Experiment Coulter Counter Calcium Oxalate Crystal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    W. G. Robertson, M. Peacock, and B. E. C. Nordin, Clin. Sci. 40:365 (1971).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    W. G. Robertson, M. Peacock, and B. E. C. Nordin, Clin. Sci. 43:499 (1972).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    W. G. Robertson, M. Peacock, and B. E. C. Nordin, Clin. Chem. Acta. 43:31 (1973).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    B. Tomazic, and G. H. Nancollas, Invest. Urol. 6:329 (1979).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    G. H. Nancollas, and G. L. Gardner, J. Cryst. Growth 21:267 (1974).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    W. Stumm, and J. J. Morgan, in: “Aquatic Chemistry,” Wiley Interscience, New York (1970).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    M. Markovic, and Lj. Komunjer, J. Cryst. Growth 46:701 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    A. E. Nielsen, in: “Kinetics of Precipitation,” Pergamon Press, Oxford (1964).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    G. L. Gardner, J. Cryst. Growth 30:158 (1975).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    A. E. Nielsen, Acta. Chem. Scand. 14:1654 (1960).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Füredi-Milhofer
    • 1
  • D. Skrtić
    • 1
  • M. Marković
    • 1
  • Lj. Komunjer
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for Precipitation Processes“Rudjer Bosković” InstituteZagrebYugoslavia

Personalised recommendations