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Urolithiasis pp 359-362 | Cite as

Should Recurrent Calcium Oxalate Stone Formers Eat Less Animal Protein?

  • W. G. Robertson
  • M. Peacock
  • P. J. Heyburn
  • F. A. Hanes
  • D. Ouimet
  • A. Rutherford
  • V. J. Sergeant

Abstract

It has been suggested that calcium stone-formation in the upper urinary tract is essentially a disease of the more affluent countries and sections of society1,2. This hypothesis is supported by the observations that the rate of hospitalization for stones has been increasing in industrialized countries over the last 30–40 years1,3,4 and that calcium stone-formers are found more frequently in the more affluent social classes 1 and 2 than in the less well off sections of society5,6. Further studies have indicated that the only dietary factor which is correlated consistently at all demographic levels with affluence is the intake of animal protein, particularly the flesh protein fraction4,6,7. Moreover, stone-formers consume more animal protein than normal subjects7,8. These observations suggest that the risk of stones in a given population is proportional to the consumption of animal protein.

Keywords

Uric Acid Animal Protein Calcium Oxalate Calcium Oxalate Stone Affluent Country 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    D. A. Andersen, in: “Urinary Calculi,” L. Cifuentes-Delatte, A. Rapado, and A. Hodgkinson, eds., Karger, Basel (1973).Google Scholar
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    W. G. Robertson, M. Peacock, and A. Hodgkinson, J. Chron. Dis. 32:469 (1979).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    W. G. Robertson, M. Peacock, P. J. Heyburn, F. A. Hanes, A. Rutherford, E. Clementson, R. Swaminathan, and P. B. Clark, Br. J. Urol. 51:427 (1979).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    B. E. C. Nordin, M. Peacock, and R. Wilkinson, Clinics Endocrin. and Metab. 1:169 (1972).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    W. G. Robertson, M. Peacock, P. J. Heyburn, R. W. Marshall, A. Rutherford, R. E. Williams, and P. B. Clark, in: “Oxalate in Human Biochemistry and Clinical Pathology,” G. A. Rose, W. G. Robertson, and R. W. E. Watts, eds., Wellcome Foundation, London (1980).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. G. Robertson
    • 1
  • M. Peacock
    • 1
  • P. J. Heyburn
    • 1
  • F. A. Hanes
    • 1
  • D. Ouimet
    • 1
  • A. Rutherford
    • 1
  • V. J. Sergeant
    • 1
  1. 1.M.R.C. Mineral Metabolism UnitThe General InfirmaryLeedsUK

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