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Urolithiasis pp 275-282 | Cite as

Experiences with Long-Term Use of Sodium Cellulose Phosphate for Prevention of Renal Calcium Stones

  • S. Ljunghall
  • U. Backman
  • B. G. Danielson
  • B. Fellström
  • G. Johansson
  • B. Wikström
  • O. Wålinder

Abstract

A high urinary calcium level is common in renal stone patients1,2. The majority of hypercalciuric patients appear to have a primary intestinal hyperabsorption of calcium3,4. Since the risk of calcium stone-formation is closely related to the urinary calcium output1,5 a logical approach for prevention of stones should be to reduce the amount of calcium absorbed from the intestine and thereby its excretion through the kidneys. When dietary calcium restriction fails to reduce calcium excretion and stone-formation is of clinical importance drug treatment might be indicated.

Keywords

Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Urinary Calcium Renal Stone Calcium Oxalate Stone Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Ljunghall
    • 1
  • U. Backman
    • 1
  • B. G. Danielson
    • 1
  • B. Fellström
    • 1
  • G. Johansson
    • 1
  • B. Wikström
    • 1
  • O. Wålinder
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity HospitalUppsalaSweden

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