Advertisement

Urolithiasis pp 875-879 | Cite as

Decomposition of Exogenous 14C-Oxalate (14C-OX) to 14C-Carbon Dioxide (14CO2) In Vitro and in Animals

  • V. Hagmaier
  • D. Hornig
  • C. Bannwart
  • K. Schmidt
  • F. Weber
  • H. Graf
  • G. Rutishauser

Summary

The question concerning bacterial decomposition of oxalate by intestinal microorganisms is unresolved. Varying amounts of oxalate were incubated with human feces. The formed CO2 was determined by liquid scintillation counting. Oxalate was found to be metabolized by bacteria from the human feces. However, the deterioration was very small (0.15%). In a second experiment rats and guinea pigs received 14C-Ox by gastric intubation. The exhalation14CO2 of measured. In guinea pigs the major pathway of metabolism of exogenous Ox was found to be respiratory exhalation (72%). In contrary, the rat excreted only 5% as CO2. Therefore, balance studies with Ox in guinea pigs are only valuable when following the CO2 exhalation.

Keywords

Liquid Scintillation Counting Balance Study Human Feces Oxalate Sodium Gastric Intubation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    K. Schmidt, V. Hagmaier, G. Bruchelt, and G. Rutishauser, Urol. Res. (in press).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    P. M. Zarembski, and A. Hodgkinson, Br. J. Nutr. 16:627 (1962).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    C. Bannwart, V. Hagmaier, G. Rutishauser, H. Seiler, Eur. Urol. 5:276 (1979).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    V. Hagmaier, C. Bannwart, W. Remagen, and G. Rutishauser, Eur. Urol. 6:172 (1980).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    M. P. Morris, and J. Garcia-Riviera, J. Dairy Sci. 38:1169 (1955).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    T. S. Chandra, and Y. J. Shethna, J. Microbiol, and Serol. 41: 101 (1975).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    H. H. Barber, and F. J. Gallimore, Biochem. J. 34:144 (1940).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    G. Brubacher, M. Just, H. Bodur, and K. Bernhard, Physiol. Chem. 304:173 (1956).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    T. D. Elder, and J. B. Wyngaarden, J. Clin. Invest. 39:1337 (1960).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Hagmaier
    • 1
  • D. Hornig
    • 2
  • C. Bannwart
    • 1
  • K. Schmidt
    • 3
  • F. Weber
    • 2
  • H. Graf
    • 1
  • G. Rutishauser
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Urology, Department of SurgeryUniversity of BaselBaselSwitzerland
  2. 2.Department Vitamin Nutrition ResearchHoffmann-La RocheBaselSwitzerland
  3. 3.Department of SurgeryUniversity of TübingenTübingenGermany

Personalised recommendations