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Urolithiasis pp 775-778 | Cite as

Intestinal Oxalate Absorption in Calcium Oxalate Stone Disease

  • J. W. Dobbins
  • K. Cooper
  • R. Lang
  • L. H. Smith
  • H. J. Binder
  • A. E. Broadus

Abstract

Several laboratories have reported a slight but significant increase in urinary oxalate excretion in patients with calcium oxalate stone disease1–4. The mechanism responsible for this increased oxalate excretion remains largely unknown. Zarembski and Hodgkinson5, and Robertson et al.1 reported that patients with calcium oxalate stones had a greater increase in urinary oxalate excretion than did normal subjects when placed on an increased oxalate diet. However, Barilla et al, in a similar study, did not confirm this observation7. Hodgkinson also reported that the increased oxalate excretion in patients with calcium oxalate stones was abolished by fasting8. These studies, in the aggregate, suggest that increased oxalate absorption might account for the increased oxalate excretion in certain patients with calcium stone disease.

Keywords

Calcium Diet Calcium Oxalate Intestinal Calcium Absorption Calcium Oxalate Stone Oxalate Absorption 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. W. Dobbins
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. Cooper
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Lang
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. H. Smith
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. J. Binder
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. E. Broadus
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of MedicineYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineMayo Medical SchoolRochesterUSA

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