Urolithiasis pp 669-672 | Cite as

Interaction of Dyes with Inorganic Constituents of Kidney Stones

  • Bart van’t Riet
  • Charles E. O’Rear


Inhibitory effect of dyes on formation and growth of urinary calculi has been shown for methylene blue in vivo, not only in animals1, but also in clinical studies2, 3. Because the mechanism of action is not certain, our purpose was to study the interaction of a variety of dyes with crystals which can be present in urinary calculi. Generally the assumption is made that dyes are absorbed on the surface of crystals, reaching a saturation value, probably a monolayer of dye on certain faces of the crystals, and no more dye is absorbed with further increase of the dye concentration in solution. This assumption was tested for 6 dyes in adsorption studies on calcium oxalate monohydrate, calcium hydrogen phosphate, and on magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate. The crystals were prepared by standard precipitation procedures, and air dried. In the dye solutions an excess of one of the crystal ions was also used in order to evaluate competition of dye ions with these crystal ions for sites on the surface. Generally 0.01M excess of either a positive or negative ion, and an equivalent aqueous dye solution were used. Excess of CA++ precipitated Wool Violet 4BN, and therefore this combination was eliminated.


Methylene Blue Kidney Stone Calcium Oxalate Mixed Crystal Urinary Calculus 


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  1. 1.
    B. van’t Riet, C. E. O’Rear, and M. J. V. Smith, Invest. Urol. 16:201 (1978).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    W. H. Boyce, W. M. McKinney, T. L. Long, and G. W. Drach, J. Urol. 97:783 (1967).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    M. J. V. Smith, Urol. 6:676 (1975).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bart van’t Riet
    • 1
  • Charles E. O’Rear
    • 2
  1. 1.VCU/Medical College of VirginiaRichmondUSA
  2. 2.Department of Forensic SciencesGeorge Washington UniversityUSA

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