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Self-Esteem pp 147-165 | Cite as

Caught in the Crossfire: Positivity and Self-Verification Strivings Among People with Low Self-Esteem

  • Chris De La Ronde
  • William B. SwannJr.
Part of the The Plenum Series in Social / Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

Why do people with negative self-concepts consistently behave in ways that alienate their interaction partners? After all, such persons—that is, depressed persons and those with low self-esteem—typically suffer when they are rejected, and they seem motivated to bring others to like them. Yet, they persist in enacting precisely those behaviors that repel their interaction partners. It almost seems as if such persons have two individuals lurking within: one urging them to seek favorable reactions, the other demanding that they solicit unfavorable reactions.

Keywords

Social Psychology Interaction Partner Cognitive Resource Experimental Social Psychology Depressed Person 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chris De La Ronde
    • 1
  • William B. SwannJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of PsychologyUniversity of Texas at AustinAustinUSA

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