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Self-Esteem pp 37-53 | Cite as

The Social Motivations of People with Low Self-Esteem

  • Dianne M. Tice
Part of the The Plenum Series in Social / Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

Low self-esteem people have always been a puzzle to researchers. For years, many theorists began with the plausible yet probably false assumption that people with low self-esteem were generally the opposite of those with high self-esteem; by this reasoning, if people with high self-esteem want to succeed and be liked, then people with low self- esteem must want to fail and be disliked. More recent theorists (e.g., S. Jones, 1973; Shrauger, 1975) have suggested that the notion that low self-esteem people desire failure and rejection is false. The question remains, however: What do these people want?

Keywords

Social Motivation Social Psychology Bulletin Conceptual Replication Failure Feedback Nonverbal Intelligence Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dianne M. Tice
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of PsychologyCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

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