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Atheroembolic Renal Disease: Clinico-Pathologic Correlations

  • F. Antonucci
  • S. Pizzolitto
  • M. Travaglini
  • G. F. Marrocco
  • G. Boscutti
  • M. Messa
  • G. B. Fogazzi
  • E. Rivolta
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 252)

Abstract

It has been known for long time that the course of atherosclerotic disease may be complicated by systemic manifestations of cholesterol embolism (1). The kidney is frequently involved in this phenomenon (2) which may give rise to diverse clinical pictures. The clinical diagnosis of atheroembolic renal disease may be easy in the presence of other embolic manifestations (livedo reticularis, digital ischemic necrosis, retinal emboli) and a clinical history of angiography, angioplasty and recent abdominal aortic surgery. In these cases, the cutaneous and muscular biopsies may provide valid and not invasive diagnostic support (3). When atheroembolism appears spontaneously, in the absence of causal events, and the clinical history is of acute or chronic renal failure of unknown origin, only renal biopsy with pathognomonic findings of needle-shaped cholesterol crystals within the vessel lumen permits diagnosis, distinguishing atheroembolic lesions from those of nephroangiosclerosis or other pathologies.

Keywords

Fibrinoid Necrosis Progressive Renal Failure Segmental Sclerosis Arcuate Artery Pathognomonic Finding 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Antonucci
    • 1
  • S. Pizzolitto
    • 2
  • M. Travaglini
    • 3
  • G. F. Marrocco
    • 3
  • G. Boscutti
    • 1
  • M. Messa
    • 1
  • G. B. Fogazzi
    • 4
  • E. Rivolta
    • 4
  1. 1.Servizio NefrologiaItaly
  2. 2.Istituto Anatomia PatologicaItaly
  3. 3.III DivisioneChirurgica Ospedale Civile UdineItaly
  4. 4.Divisione NefrologicaPoliclinico MilanoItaly

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