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Hypokalemia

  • Neil A. Kurtzman
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 252)

Abstract

In healthy adults potassium intake averages about 60–100 mEq per day. Of this, 90% is excreted in the urine, the remaining 10% appears in the stool. Since potassium is the main intracellular cation, less than 2% of body potassium appears in extracellular fluid. Even though the great bulk of potassium is in intracellular fluid, there is a good relationship between the state of body potassium stores and the serum potassium. In general, the greater the potassium deficit, the greater the fall in serum potassium. This relationship is essentially linear. Virtually all the filtered potassium is reabsorbed by the kidney prior to the collecting tubule. Thus, all the potassium that appears in the urine is secreted in the terminal nephron.

Keywords

Primary Aldosteronism Renal Tubular Acidosis Metabolic Alkalosis Glycyrrhizic Acid Periodic Paralysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Neil A. Kurtzman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineTexas Tech University Health Sciences CenterLubbockUSA

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