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The Concepts of ‘Adaptation’ and ‘Attunement’ in Skill Learning

  • H. T. A. Whiting
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 16)

Abstract

While an ill-defined system may be difficult to delineate and while such delineation may not hold for all systems, the concept has a certain value when man is being considered as a skilled ‘actor’*. As Jones (1967) points out:
  • Biological modes of operation are self-organising, evolutionary, growing, decaying, differentiating and self-reproducing. In all, a system of high variety. But besides its biological nature, in which ergonomie man can be described as a ‘skilled animal’, the human being is capable of conscious thoughts, he has a personality and may possess other non-material qualities which characterise his performance, which defy description in system terms and which are usually left out of calculations.

Keywords

Movement Pattern Motor Learning Skill Acquisition Velocity Control Elbow Movement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. T. A. Whiting
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology Interfaculty of Human Movement Science and EducationThe Free UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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