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Arterial Chemoreceptors Reflexes in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) and in Patients with Essential Hypertension

  • M. Tafil-Klawe
  • F. Raschke
  • H. Becker
  • R. Stoohs
  • A. Kublik
  • T. Podszus
  • J. H. Peter
  • P. von Wichert

Abstract

One of the mechanisms proposed in essential hypertension, is an enhancement of peripheral chemosensitivity of the respiratory drive (Przybylski, 1981). This possibility appears interesting in view of the close central interaction between the respiratory and sympathetic control systems. Alveolar hyperventilation and respiratory alkalosis were found in young spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) (Przybylski, 1978). A higher increase in carotid nerve chemoreceptor discharge during hypoxia was found in SHR as compared to normotensive rats (Fukuda et al., 1987). Patients in early stages of essential hypertension exhibit an augmented resting and hypoxic ventilatory and circulatory drive from arterial chemoreceptors (Trzebski et al., 1982; Tafil-Klawe et al., 1985). Hypertrophy of the carotid bodies has been found in humans with essential hypertension (Edwards et al., 1971; Habeck et al., 1981). Recently, a striking association has been found between the occurrence of sleep apnea syndrome and essential hypertension (Koskenvuo et al., 1985; Lugaresi et al., 1980). More than 50% of the patients with years of hypertension suffer from sleep apnea (Peter, 1987). The question arises, if there is any link between essential hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, and peripheral and/or central chemosensitivity?.

Keywords

Essential Hypertension Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Carotid Body Ventilatory Response Central Sleep Apnea 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Tafil-Klawe
    • 1
  • F. Raschke
    • 2
  • H. Becker
    • 3
  • R. Stoohs
    • 3
  • A. Kublik
    • 3
  • T. Podszus
    • 3
  • J. H. Peter
    • 3
  • P. von Wichert
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyMedical AcademyWarsawPoland
  2. 2.Inst. f. Arbeitsphysiologie u. RehabilitationsforschungMarburg/LahnGermany
  3. 3.Zentrum f. Innere MedizinPoliklinik d. Philipps-Univ.Marburg/LahnGermany

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