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Effects of Hyperoxia on Salt Intake in Carotid Body Denervated Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR)

  • R. Behm
  • H. Dewitz
  • A. Gramse
  • K. Rückborn

Abstract

The factors controlling the excessive salt appetite of SHR are not entirely understood. Various environmental factors and humoral systems have been postulated to contribute to this appetite (Denton, 1984; Fregly and Rowland, 1985; Di Nicolantonio et al., 1983). There is some evidence that the exaggerated salt intake of SHR is closely linked to their chemoreceptor activity (Behm et al., 1987a). Both physiological and pharmacological stiumlation of the carotid bodies lead to a sustained suppression of their voluntary salt intake (Behm et al., 1984; Behm et al., 1987b). Denervation of the carotid bodies abolishes these effects (Behm et al., 1989). In a preliminary study, we recently demonstrated that exposure of conscious SHR to moderate hyperoxia (40%) causes a transient but significant increase in salt intake (Behm et al., 1987a).

Keywords

Salt Intake Carotid Body Hypobaric Hypoxia Sustained Suppression Total Fluid Intake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Behm
    • 1
  • H. Dewitz
    • 1
  • A. Gramse
    • 1
  • K. Rückborn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyWilhelm Pieck UniversityRostockGDR

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