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Ventilatory and Blood Pressure Reactions to Acute Hypoxia and Hyperoxia in Chemoreceptor-Denervated NWR and SHR

  • C. Huckstorf
  • K. Rückborn
  • B. Gerber
  • J.-O. Habeck

Abstract

The peripheral arterial chemoreceptors are the specific sensors that inform the central nervous system about the arterial oxygen tension or content. They play an important role not only in the reflex control of respiration but also in that of the cardiovascular system (Daly, 1983). The peripheral arterial chemoreceptors are located within the carotid and aortic bodies, and glomus tissues are widely distributed in the cervical, thoracic, and abdominal area (Sinclair, 1987). The carotid bodies are the best investigated chemoreceptors. They are excited by a reduction in arterial PO2 independently of the triggering reason. So they are stimulated by systemic hypoxia as well as by local stagnant hypoxia in the presence of normal arterial PO2 values due to a reduction of the intraglomic blood flow.

Keywords

Arterial Blood Pressure Mean Arterial Blood Pressure Carotid Body Ventilatory Response Acute Hypoxia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Huckstorf
    • 1
  • K. Rückborn
    • 1
  • B. Gerber
    • 1
  • J.-O. Habeck
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of PhysiologyWilhelm-Pieck-UniversityRostockGDR
  2. 2.Institute of PathologyBezirkskrankenhaus “Friedrich Wolf”Karl-Marx-StadtGDR

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