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White Cell-Endothelium Interaction During Postischemic Reperfusion of Skin and Skeletal Muscle

  • K. Messmer
  • F. U. Sack
  • M. D. Menger
  • R. Bartlett
  • J. H. Barker
  • F. Hammersen
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 242)

Abstract

Reperfusion failure after prolonged ischemia is characterized by sequestration of granulocytes within the microvasculature of the ischemic organs and tissues. Leukocytes, activated by tissue trauma, complement factor C5 and/or endotoxin interact with the endothelium surface and eventually emigrate through the vessel wall into the perivascular tissue. Sticking and emigration of polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) is associated with formation of oxygen derived radicals and leakage of plasma through the microvascular walls indicating disturbance of the endothelial barrier function.1,2

Keywords

Hairless Mouse Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease Endothelial Barrier Function Functional Capillary Density Skin Microcirculation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Messmer
    • 1
  • F. U. Sack
    • 1
  • M. D. Menger
    • 1
  • R. Bartlett
    • 1
  • J. H. Barker
    • 1
  • F. Hammersen
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Experimental SurgeryUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.Dept. of AnatomyTechnical University of MunichMunichGermany

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