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Prognostic Significance of Terminal Transferase Activity and other Factors in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  • John J. Hutton
  • Mary Sue Coleman
  • Steven Moffitt
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 145)

Abstract

Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TDT) is an intracellular biochemical marker of certain types of lymphoid precursors. Clinically, TDT serves as a useful marker of malignant lymphoblasts. TDT activity is elevated in 85–95% of cases of non-B, non-T and T-marked acute lymphoblastic leukemias, 5–10% of cases of acute myelogenous leukemia, and 30–40% of cases of chronic myelogenous in blastic phase (reviewed by Coleman and Hutton, 1981). The presence of TDT in leukemic cells is correlated with a favorable response to therapy with drugs cytocidal to lymphoblasts. There is marked variation in the activity of TDT in leukemic cells at diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In our experience values ranged from 0 to 694 units/108 nucleated cells in bone marrow from 118 children and from 0 to 1790 units/108 nucleated cells in peripheral blood from 51 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Hutton et al, 1979). There are no studies testing the prognostic significance of these quantitative variations in level of TDT at diagnosis. Similarly, there are no studies testing whether quantitative measurements of TDT activity during remission of leukemia can predict relapse of disease.

Keywords

Bone Marrow Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Nucleate Cell Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Coleman, M. S., Greenwood, M. F., Hutton, J. J., Bollum, F. J., Lampkin, B., and Holland, P., 1976, Serial observations on terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase activity and lymphoblast surface markers in acute l3miphoblastic leukemia, Cancer Res., 36:120.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Coleman, M. S., and Hutton, J. J., 1981, Terminal transferase, in; “The Leukemic Cell,” D. Catovsky, ed., Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh.Google Scholar
  3. Gordon, D. S., Hutton, J. J., Smalley, R. V., Meyer, L. M., and Vogler, W. R., 1978, Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase, cytochemistry, and membrane receptors in adult acute leukemia, Blood, 52:1079.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Greenwood, M. F., Coleman, M. S., Hutton, J. J., Lampkin, B., Krill, C., Bollum, F. J., and Holland, P., 1977, Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase distribution in neoplastic and hematopoietic cells, J. Clin. Invest., 59:889.Google Scholar
  5. Hutton, J. J., Coleman, M. S., Keneklis, T. P., and Bollum, F. J., 1979, Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase as a tumor cell marker in leukemia and lymphoma: Results from 1000 patients, in: “Biological Basis For Cancer Diagnosis,” M. Fox, ed., Pergamon Press, Oxford.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • John J. Hutton
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Mary Sue Coleman
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Steven Moffitt
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of MedicineUniversity of TexasSan AntonioUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA
  3. 3.Department of BiometryEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA

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