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Prosody and Musical Rhythm are Controlled by the Speech Hemisphere

  • Hans M. Borchgrevink

Abstract

Cerebral processing of both speech and music imply analysis and identification of
  1. 1.

    the spectral pattern of complex sound

     
  2. 2.

    the temporal sequence pattern of complex sound during a certain time period.

     

Keywords

Speech Perception Chapter VIII Dichotic Listening Complex Sound Speech Comprehension 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hans M. Borchgrevink
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Aviation MedicineOsloNorway

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