Condition Monitoring for Fatigue — Implications of Fatigue Crack Shape

  • R. A. Smith


Condition monitoring for fatigue is often hampered by incomplete knowledge of crack dimensions; particularly penetration depth into the component. This paper discusses some generalizations made possible by results from a finite element technique which automatically predicts crack shape for planar cracks of initially general profile. Two specific examples are given: that of two interacting cracks and a practical case of a crack in industrial component where considerations of crack shape were able to assist in formulating a monitoring policy.


Fatigue Crack Crack Front Crack Shape Finite Element Technique Bolt Hole 


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  1. 1.
    K. Kishimoto, W.O. Soboyejo, R.A. Smith & J.F. Knott, 1989. A Numerical Investigation of the Interaction and Coalescence of Twin Coplanar Semi-Elliptical Fatigue Cracks. International Journal of Fatigue, 11. 2, pp 91–96.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    R.A. Smith, 1989. Aspects of the Interaction Between a Fatigue Crack and a Local Brittle Zone (LBZ). In Proceedings 8th International Conference Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering, The Hague, March 19–23, 3, Ed. M.M. Salama et al, ASME, New York, pp 705–708.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    R.A. Smith and J.F. Cooper, 1989. A Finite Element Model for the Shape Development of Irregular Planar Cracks. International Journal of Pressure Vessels and Piping, 16, 4, pp 313–326.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    W.O. Soboyejo, K. Kishimoto, R.A. Smith & J.F. Knott, 1989. Fatigue of Engineering Materials and Structures, 12, 3, 1989, pp 167–174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Kogan Page Ltd. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Mechanical and Process EngineeringUniversity of SheffieldUK

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