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Autonomic System Reactions Caused by Excitation of Somatic Afferents: Study of Cutaneo-Intestinal Reflex

  • Kiyomi Koizumi

Abstract

Somatic responses in the body are always accompanied by reactions involving the autonomic nervous system. Any active or passive muscle movement is assisted by cardiovascular changes; painful stimuli applied to the skin or the muscle also produce changes in blood pressure and heart rate. These autonomic changes are not limited to cardiovascular changes only but also occur in other organs, such as the bladder, stomach or intestine. Thermal application, massage or gentle rubbing of the skin and the muscle are often used to relieve visceral discomfort, presumably because these sensory inputs from the cutaneo-muscular tissues affect autonomic innervation to the viscera.

Keywords

Intestinal Motility Skin Area Abdominal Skin Afferent Impulse Duodenal Motility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kiyomi Koizumi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology, Downstate Medical CenterState University of New YorkBrooklynUSA

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