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Breeding Soybeans Resistant to Diseases

  • J. R. Wilcox

Abstract

The soybean is a member of the Leguminosae, subfamily Papilionoideae, and the genus Glycine. The cultivated form, Glycine max (L.) Merrill, is grown in most of the temperate and subtropical areas of the world as a source of oil and protein (Probst and Judd 1973). Mature soybean seeds contain about 20% oil and 40% protein that has a good balance of essential amino acids. The oil is used primarily for human consumption, and a small quantity goes into industrial uses. After the oil is extracted from the seed, the residual meal is used primarily as a livestock feed. The protein, however, is extracted from a small percentage of the meal and is used in various food products for human consumption.

Keywords

Powdery Mildew Soybean Cultivar Soybean Mosaic Virus Soybean Rust Breeding Soybean 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Avi Publishing Company, Inc. 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. R. Wilcox
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.U.S. Department of AgricultureAgricultural Research ServiceWest LafayetteUSA
  2. 2.Purdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA

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