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Dedication: Henry A. Jones (1889–1981) Plant Breeder Extraordinaire

  • Thomas W. Whitaker

Abstract

It is fitting that the first volume of Plant Breeding Reviews be dedicated to the memory of Dr. Henry A. Jones, plant breeder extraordinaire.

Keywords

Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Downy Mildew Allium Cepa Pink Root Potato Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

Publications of H.A. Jones Books

  1. JONES, H.A. and J.T. ROSA. 1928. Truck Crop Plants. McGraw-Hill, New York.Google Scholar
  2. JONES, H.A. and S.L. EMSWELLER. 1931. The vegetable industry. McGraw-Hill, New York and London.Google Scholar
  3. JONES, H.A. and L.K. MANN. 1963. Onions and their allies: botany, cultivation, and utilization. Leonard Hill Books Limited, London.Google Scholar

Publications of H.A. Jones Research Papers

  1. JONES, H.A. 1921. Preliminary report on onion dormancy studies. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 17:128–133.Google Scholar
  2. JONES, H.A. and V. R. BOSWELL. 1922. Time of flower primordia formation in the onion (Allium cepa L.) Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 19:144–147.Google Scholar
  3. JONES, H.A. 1923. Pollination and self-fertility in the onion. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 20:191–197.Google Scholar
  4. JONES, H.A. and W.W. ROBBINS. 1924. Growing and handling asparagus crowns. Calif. Agr. Ext. Sta. Bul. 381.Google Scholar
  5. ROBBINS, W.W. and H.A. JONES. 1925. Secondary sex characters in Asparagus officinalis L. Hilgardia 1:183–202.Google Scholar
  6. WALKER, J.C., H.A. JONES and A.E. CLARKE. 1925. Studies on disease resistance in the onion. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 11:183–189.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. BISSON, C.S., H.A. JONES and W.W. ROBBINS. 1926. Factors influencing the quality of fresh asparagus after it is harvested. Calif. Agr. Ext. Sta. Bul. 410.Google Scholar
  8. JONES, H.A. and W.W. ROBBINS. 1926. Influence of cutting asparagus the first year after planting on production the following year. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 23:23–28.Google Scholar
  9. JONES, H.A. and W.W. ROBBINS. 1926. Influence of dessication and root pruning on the performance of asparagus. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 23: 26–28.Google Scholar
  10. ROBBINS, W.D. and H.A. JONES. 1926. Sex as a factor in growing asparagus. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 23:19–23.Google Scholar
  11. JONES, H.A. 1927. Pollination and life history studies of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). Hilgardia 2:425–479.Google Scholar
  12. JONES, H.A. 1928. The influence of storage temperature on seed production in the Ebenezer onion. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 24:61–63.Google Scholar
  13. JONES, H.A. and E.L. GARTHWAITE. 1928. Growing and handling head lettuce in California. Calif. Agr. Ext. Sta. Cir. 295.Google Scholar
  14. JONES, H.A. and W.W. ROBBINS. 1928. The asparagus industry in California. Calif. Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul. 446.Google Scholar
  15. JONES, H.A. 1929. The home vegetable garden. Calif. Agr. Ext. Cir. 60.Google Scholar
  16. JONES, H.A. 1930. Spacing, time-of-planting and size-of-seedling studies with the California Early Red onion. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 26: 141–118.Google Scholar
  17. BISSON, C.S. and H.A. JONES. 1932. Changes accompanying fruit development in the garden pea. Plant. Physiol. 7:91–105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. JONES, H.A. 1932. Effect of extending the cutting season on the yield of asparagus. Calif. Agr. Expt. Bul. 535.Google Scholar
  19. JONES, H.A. 1932. Vegetable breeding at the University of California-presidential address. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 29:572–581.Google Scholar
  20. JONES, H.A. and C.S. BISSON. 1932. Changes in the composition of garden peas after harvest. Plant Physiology 7:273–283.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. JONES, H.A. and A.A. TU. 1932. The head-lettuce industry of California. Calif. Agr. Expt. Sta. Cir. 60.Google Scholar
  22. JONES, H.A. and S.L. EMSWELLER. 1933. Methods of breeding onions. Hilgardia 7:625–642.Google Scholar
  23. PORTER, D.R. and H.A. JONES. 1933. Resistance of some cultivated species of Allium to pink root (Phoma tenestria). Phytopathology, 23:290–298.Google Scholar
  24. BISSON, C.S. and H.A. JONES. 1934. Determining changes in stored material by use of a reference element. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 31:122–124.Google Scholar
  25. JONES, H.A., S.F. BAILEY and S.L. EMSWELLER. 1934. Thrips resistance in the onion. Hilgardia 8: 215–232.Google Scholar
  26. JONES, H.A. and S.L. EMSWELLER. 1934. The use of flies as onion pollinators. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 31:160–164.Google Scholar
  27. JONES, H.A., C.F. POOLE and S.L. EMSWELLER. 1934. Bolting habit in the onion. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 33:490 (Abstr.).Google Scholar
  28. BISSON, C.S., H.A. JONES and H.W. ALLINGER. 1935. Determining changes in stored peas by use of a reference element. Hilgardia 10:143–165.Google Scholar
  29. EMSWELLER, S.L. and H.A. JONES. 1935. A gene for control of interstitial localization of chiasmata in Allium fistulosum L. Science (n.s.) 81:543–544.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. EMSWELLER, S.L. and H.A. JONES. 1935. An interspecific hybrid in Allium. Hilgardia 9:265–273.Google Scholar
  31. JONES, H.A. and S.L. EMSWELLER. 1935. Development of the flower and female gametophyte in Allium cepa. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 33:480 (Abstr.).Google Scholar
  32. JONES, H.A., F.H. ERNST and A.A. TAVERNETTI. 1935. The cauliflower industry of California. Calif. Agr. Expt. Cir. 93.Google Scholar
  33. JONES, H.A. and S.L. EMSWELLER. 1936. A male-sterile onion. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 34:582–585.Google Scholar
  34. JONES, H.A. and S.L. EMSWELLER. 1936. Development of the flower and macrogametophyte of Allium cepa. Hilgardia 10:415–428.Google Scholar
  35. JONES, H.A. 1937. Onion improvement. USDA Yearbook of Agriculture. p. 233–250.Google Scholar
  36. JONES, H.A. and S.L. EMSWELLER. 1939. Effect of storage, bulb size, spacing, and time of planting on production of onion seed. Bul. Calif. Agr. Expt. Sta. 628.Google Scholar
  37. JONES, H.A., D.R. PORTER and L.D. LEACH. 1939. Breeding for resistance to onion downy mildew caused by Peronospora destructor. Hilgardia 12:531–550.Google Scholar
  38. JONES, H.A. and B.L. WADE. 1939. Inoculation studies with garden pea in California. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 37:718–724.Google Scholar
  39. JONES, H.A. and G.C. HANNA. 1940. Crown grading experiments with asparagus. Calif. Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul. 633.Google Scholar
  40. MAGRUDER, R., V.R. BOSWELL, H.A. JONES, J.C. MILLER, J.F. WOOD, L.R. HAWTHORN, M.M. PARKER and H.H. ZIMMERLEY. 1940. Description of types of principal American varieties of red garden beets. U.S. Dept. Agr. Publ. 374.Google Scholar
  41. MAGRUDER, R., R.E. WESTER, H.A. JONES, T.E. RANDALL, G.B. SNYDER, H.D. BROWN, L.R. HAWTHORN and A.L. WILSON. 1941. Descriptions of types of principal American varieties of onions. U.S. Dept. Agr. Misc. Publ. 435.Google Scholar
  42. PORTER, D.R., H.A. JONES and G.N. DAVIS. 1941. Newly developed vegetable varieties for use in California. Calif. Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul. 646.Google Scholar
  43. JONES, H.A. and A.E. CLARKE. 1942. A natural amphidiploid from an onion species hybrid. J. Hered. 33:25–32.Google Scholar
  44. CALDWELL, J.S., H.A. JONES, C.W. CULPEPPER and P.M. LOMBARD. 1943. Varieties of onions for dehydration. U.S. Dept. Agr. Unnumbered mimeo.Google Scholar
  45. JONES, H.A. and A.E. CLARKE. 1943. Inheritance of male sterility in the onion and the production of hybrid seed. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 43: 189–194.Google Scholar
  46. CLARKE, A.E., H.A. JONES and T.M. LITTLE. 1944. Inheritance of bulb color in onion. Genetics 29:569–575.Google Scholar
  47. JONES, H.A. 1944. Problems and progress in onion breeding. Herbertia 11:275–294.Google Scholar
  48. JONES, H.A., A.E. CLARKE and F.J. STEVENSON. 1944. Studies in the genetics of the onion (Allium cepa LJ). Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 44: 479–484.Google Scholar
  49. JONES, H.A. and G.N. DAVIS. 1944. Inbreeding and heterosis and their relation to the development of new varieties of onions. U.S. Dept. Agr. Tech. Bul. 874.Google Scholar
  50. JONES, H.A., L.R. HAWTHORN and G.N. DAVIS. 1944. Growing the transplant onion crip. U.S. Dept. Agr. Farmer’s Bul. 1956 (Rev. 1949).Google Scholar
  51. LITTLE, T.M., H.A. JONES and A.E. CLARKE. 1944. The distribution of the male sterility gene in varieties of onion. Herbertia 11:310–312.Google Scholar
  52. WALKER, J.C. and H.A. JONES. 1944. Onion set production. U.S. Dept. Agr. Farmer’s Bul. 1955.Google Scholar
  53. JONES, H.A., B.A. PERRY and W.C. EDMUNDSEN. 1946. Vegetative propagation of short-day varieties of onions as an aid in a breeding program. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 53:367–370.Google Scholar
  54. JONES, H.A., J.C. WALKER, T.M. LITTLE and R.H. LARSEN. 1946. Relation of color inhibiting factor to smudge resistance in onions. J. Agr. Res. 72:259–264.Google Scholar
  55. JONES, H.A. and A.E. CLARKE. 1947. The story of hybrid onions. Science and Farming. Yearbook of Agriculture. U.S. Dept. Agr., p. 320–326.Google Scholar
  56. JONES, H.A., B.A. PERRY and G.N. DAVIS. 1947. The new ‘Excel’. South. Seedsman 10 (3): 13,Google Scholar
  57. JONES, H.A., B.A. PERRY and G.N. DAVIS. 1947. The new ‘Excel’. South. Seedsman 10 (3): 57Google Scholar
  58. JONES, H.A., B.A. PERRY and G.N. DAVIS. 1947. The new ‘Excel’. South. Seedsman 10 (3): and 60.Google Scholar
  59. JONES, H.A. and B.A. PERRY. 1951. Hybrid may cause boom in new silver and gold onion. South. Seedsman 14 (9):21,Google Scholar
  60. JONES, H.A. and B.A. PERRY. 1951. Hybrid may cause boom in new silver and gold onion. South. Seedsman 14 (9): 61Google Scholar
  61. JONES, H.A. and B.A. PERRY. 1951. Hybrid may cause boom in new silver and gold onion. South. Seedsman 14 (9): and 67.Google Scholar
  62. JONES, H.A. and C.E. PETERSON. 1952. Complementary factors for light-red bulb color in onions. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 59:457.Google Scholar
  63. PERRY, B.A. and H.A. JONES. 1953. ‘L 36’ early yellow and ‘L 365’ white, lick pink root. South. Seedsman 160 (10):15,Google Scholar
  64. PERRY, B.A. and H.A. JONES. 1953. ‘L 36’ early yellow and ‘L 365’ white, lick pink root. South. Seedsman 160 (10): 72Google Scholar
  65. PERRY, B.A. and H.A. JONES. 1953. ‘L 36’ early yellow and ‘L 365’ white, lick pink root. South. Seedsman 160 (10): and 73.Google Scholar
  66. JONES, H.A., D.F. FRANKLIN and C.E. PETERSON. 1954. Bonanza, a new hybrid onion for long storage. Idaho Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul. 212.Google Scholar
  67. JONES, H.A. and B.A. PERRY. 1954. Get ready for the ’Eclipse/ South. Seedsman 17(9):20–21.Google Scholar
  68. JONES, H.A., B.A. PERRY and D.M. McLEAN. 1955. Early Hybrid 7 spinach. South. Seedsman 19(3):20,Google Scholar
  69. JONES, H.A., B.A. PERRY and D.M. McLEAN. 1955. Early Hybrid 7 spinach. South. Seedsman 19(3): 22,Google Scholar
  70. JONES, H.A., B.A. PERRY and D.M. McLEAN. 1955. Early Hybrid 7 spinach. South. Seedsman 19(3): 66.Google Scholar
  71. PERRY, B.A. and H.A. JONES. 1955. Performance of short-day, pink-root resistant varieties of onions in Southern Texas. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 66:350–353.Google Scholar
  72. JONES, H.A., D.M. McLEAN and B.A. PERRY. 1956. Breeding hybrid spinach resistant to mosaic and downy mildew. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 68:304–308.Google Scholar
  73. JONES, H.A. and B.A. PERRY. 1956. Inheritance of resistance to pink root in the onion. J. Hered. 47:33–34.Google Scholar
  74. JONES, H.A., B.A. PERRY and G.N. DAVIS. 1956. Growing the transplant onion crop. U.S. Dept. Agr. Farmer’s Bul. 1956 (revised).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Avi Publishing Company, Inc. 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas W. Whitaker
    • 1
  1. 1.U.S. Department of Agriculture (Retired) and Research Associate, Department of BiologyUniversity of CaliforniaSan Diego, La JollaUSA

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