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The Sensitivity of Aplysia Giant Neurons to Changes in Extracellular and Intracellular PO2

  • Chun-fan Chen
  • Wilhelm Erdmann
  • James H. Halsey
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 92)

Abstract

The effects of oxygen on the excitability of neurons have been studied in various groups of animals (Chalazonitis and Sugaya, 1958; Eccles et al, 1966; Chalazonitis, 1968; Kerkut and York, 1969; Steefin, 1975). However, the difficulty in recording intracellular PO2 (I · PO2) has prevented gathering of essential information concerning the effects of I · PO2 on oxidative processes and on the bioelectric phenomena of neurons. Since many giant neurons in the Aplysia abdominal ganglion are easily identifiable, stable for several days and can be penetrated with newly improved PO2 microelectrodes, we have employed them in a study of neuronal oxygen sensitivity. Chalazonitis has shown the effects of oxygen on the properties of the neuronal membrane in Aplysia by recording simultaneously, their bioelectrical properties and their I · PO2 by spectrophotometry. In the present study, we have confirmed his results of hypoxic effects on change in membrane potential and spontaneous activity.

Keywords

Abdominal Ganglion Oxygen Profile Pacemaker Potential Giant Neuron Oxygen Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chun-fan Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wilhelm Erdmann
    • 1
    • 2
  • James H. Halsey
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesFlorida International UniversityMiamiUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Anesthesiology and NeurologyUniversity of AlabamaBirminghamUSA

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