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The Effect of Dextrose/Insulin Infusion on the Duration of Respiratory Activity in the Anoxic Rat

  • R. G. Clark
  • G. Jackson Rees
  • F. Harris
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 92)

Abstract

Intra-cellular brain glucose varies with the blood glucose level in both newborn and adult animals (1). In the case of the newborn, the brain/blood glucose ratio is much higher than that of the adult, as is also the brain glycogen level in the newborn. This difference in tissue carbohydrate level in the neonate is not confined to the brain, and is true of many other tissues. The period of time for which the neonatal heart will continue to beat in the face of anoxia is directly related to the myocardial glycogen content, and if this is reduced the tolerance to anoxia is reduced proportionally (2). If, in this respect, the brain is analogous to the heart, the high tolerance of the newborn brain to anoxia would be related to the brain carbohydrate level, and if the relationship between carbohydrate level and tolerance of hypoxia were causal, it should be possible to increase the tolerance of the adult brain to anoxia by increasing the carbohydrate content of the brain.

Keywords

Cardiac Arrest Respiratory Activity Insulin Infusion Respiratory Pattern Free Atmosphere 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Mayman, C.I. (1968) Neurology 18, 294.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Dawes, G.S., Mott, J.C., and Shelley, H.J. (1959) J. Physiol. 146, 516.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Strang, R.H.C. and Bachelard, H.S. (1971) J. Neurochem. 18, 1799.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. G. Clark
    • 1
  • G. Jackson Rees
    • 1
  • F. Harris
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Pediatric Anaesthesia and Child HealthUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolEngland

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