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Directly Heated Transcutaneous Oxygen Sensor

  • H. P. Kimmich
  • J. G. Spaan
  • F. Kreuzer
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 92)

Abstract

Transcutaneous measurement of blood gases is gaining increasing interest in patient monitoring, mainly due to its non-invasiveness. In spite of many practical successes (Huch and Huch, 1975, Eberhard et al., 1975), especially in monitoring of newborns, this technique is not without disadvantages. Some of these problems are of little importance in patient monitoring such as the deviation at high PO2 obtained during oxygen therapy due to venous admixture. Other problems such as the necessity of heating the sensor to 43 or 44 °C, as well as the variability of the ratio tcPO2/PaO2 from patient to patient and in a single subject from hypoxia to hyperoxia (Goeckenjan and Strasser, 1977) and with changing blood flow, restrict the applicability of the method.

Keywords

Oxygen Transport Single Electrode Change Blood Flow Venous Admixture Practical Success 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Eberhard, P., Mindt, W., Jann, F. and Hammacher, K. (1975) Continuous pO2 monitoring in the neonate by skin electrodes. Med. & Biol. Engng., 13, 436–442.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Goeckenjan, G. and Strasser, K. (1977) Relation of transcutaneous to arterial pO2 in hypoxaemia, normoxaemia and hyperoxaemia. Bio-telemetry 4 (in press).Google Scholar
  3. Huch, A. and Huch, R. (1975) Klinische und physiologische Aspekte der transcutanen Sauerstoffdruckmessung in der Perinatalmedizin. Z. Geburtsh. Perinat. 179, 235–249.Google Scholar
  4. Kimmich, H. P. and Kreuzer, F. (1969) Catheter PO2 electrode with low flow dependency and fast response. In: Oxygen transport to Tissue. Ed.: F. Kreuzer. In: Progr. Resp. Res. Ed.: H. Herzog, S. Karger, Basel, Switzerland, 3, 100–110.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. P. Kimmich
    • 1
  • J. G. Spaan
    • 1
  • F. Kreuzer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology, Medical SchoolUniversity of NijmegenThe Netherlands

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