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Hominoid Cladistics and the Ancestry of Modern Apes and Humans

A Summary Statement
  • R. L. Ciochon
Part of the Advances in Primatology book series (AIPR)

Abstract

The major purpose for assembling this volume was to provide a forum for the presentation of alternative viewpoints on the subject of ape and human ancestry. In this chapter I will reduce those viewpoints to a summary statement reflecting the contributors’ intent through an evaluation of the volume’s major themes and by the presentation of a series of cladistic models and character analyses. Naturally it will be impossible to cover all of the points dealt with in the preceding 29 chapters. Therefore, only the salient points of the major themes of hominoid phylogeny will be considered. In particular I will consider (1) the branching order (cladogenesis) of fossil and recent hominoid primates, (2) the structural components (morphotype) of the last common ancestor of humans and the living apes as well as the morphotypes of earlier hypothetical ancestors in the diversification of the Hominoidea, (3) the timing and geographical placement of the ape-human divergence and the origin of the extant ape and human lineages, and (4) the adaptive nature and probable scenario of the Miocene hominoid cladogenesis with specific focus on the initial differentiation of hominids from their ape forebears.

Keywords

Early Hominid Enamel Thickness Miocene Hominoid Hominoid Evolution Hominid Lineage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. L. Ciochon
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PaleontologyUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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