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Summary and Round Table Discussion: Hadronic Jets

  • Stephen D. Ellis
  • K. Pretzl
  • L. Galtieri
  • A. Garfinkel
  • W. Scott
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 197)

Abstract

Hadronic jets play an essential role in the analysis of experimental data from both hadron machines and e + e colliders. These jets consist of the collimated “spray” of hadronic debris generated by the fragmentation of a quark or a gluon which is either produced or scattered into an isolated region of phase space. While we believe that, due to the phenomenon of confinement, we can never observe truly isolated single quarks or gluons, these jets of hadrons are the clear “footprints” of individual quarks and gluons which, at least for a short time, were isolated in momentum space. However, since a colored object such as a quark or gluon cannot fragment in isolation into purely color singlet hadrons nor can such a process conserve energy and momentum, we know that the fragmentation process always involves some collaboration with the other partons in the event. Hence, even at the theoretical level, there is a fundamental and unavoidable ambiguity in the definition of a jet. This is an important but not essential limitation.

Keywords

Round Table Discussion Double Parton Scattering Fundamental Ambiguity Hadron Machine Multiple Soft Scattering 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen D. Ellis
    • 1
  • K. Pretzl
  • L. Galtieri
  • A. Garfinkel
  • W. Scott
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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