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The Pleistocene Archaeology of Beringia

  • Richard E. Morlan

Abstract

After more than a century of discovery and debate and nearly two centuries after Thomas Jefferson’s speculation that North American Indians and northern Asiatics must have had a common origin (see Wilmsen 1965), we still do not know when man entered the New World. Two hundred thousand years or more are claims for greatest antiquity (Budinger 1983; Irving 1985; Steen-Mclntyre et al. 1981), but neither these nor the more modest claims of others (Bryan 1978; MacNeish 1976, 1978, 1979; Morlan 1980) have been accepted in critical reviews (Dincauze 1984; Owen 1984; Waters 1985). There is widespread evidence for human occupation after 12,000 years ago, and new South American data imply that people reached North America at an earlier time (Bryan 1986).

Keywords

Late Pleistocene Radiocarbon Date Stone Tool Human Occupation Glacial Meltwater 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard E. Morlan
    • 1
  1. 1.Archaeological Survey of CanadaCanadian Museum of CivilizationOttawaCanada

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