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Taphonomy and Hunting

  • Anna K. Behrensmeyer

Abstract

The terms “meat-eating” and “hunting” are generally used in anthropology in the same sense as “carnivory” and “predation” are used in zoology. This book symbolizes the importance that anthropologists give to hunting as a behavioral adaptation in human evolution. Meat-eating per se seems to provoke less controversy in discussions about early humans than whether the meat was acquired by hunting or scavenging.

Keywords

Fossil Assemblage Early Hominid Stone Artifact Taphonomic Process Skeletal Part 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna K. Behrensmeyer
    • 1
  1. 1.Paleobiology DepartmentSmithsonian InstitutionUSA

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