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HACCP pp 8-28 | Cite as

Overview of Biological, Chemical, and Physical Hazards

  • E. Jeffery Rhodehamel

Abstract

HACCP is a systematic approach to be used in food production as a means to ensure food safety. The first step requires a hazard analysis, an assessment of risks associated with all aspects of food production from growing to consumption. However, before one can assess the risks, a working knowledge of potential hazards must be obtained. A hazard is defined by the National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods (NACMCF) as any biological, chemical, or physical property that may cause an unacceptable consumer health risk. Thus, by definition one must be concerned with three classes of hazards; biological, chemical, and physical.

Keywords

Abdominal Cramp Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Entamoeba Histolytica Ascaris Lumbricoides Viral Gastroenteritis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Jeffery Rhodehamel

There are no affiliations available

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