Nutritional Aspects of Chronic Renal Disease in Children

  • George Christakis
  • Anthony Kafatos

Abstract

Assessment of the nutritional status of a child with chronic renal disease involves the triad of clinical investigation utilized in any medical problem: historical review, physical examination, and laboratory studies. The child with renal disease, however, presents a special clinical challenge which can be approached from three aspects:
  1. 1.

    Documenting the nutritional status of the patient, and perhaps the mother, prior to as well as during the clinical onset of the disease.

     
  2. 2.

    Determining the specific pathogenetic effects of the renal disease which alter the nutritional status of the patient as the natural history of the disease evolves into its progressively severe clinical manifestations.

     
  3. 3.

    Assessing the influence that the therapeutic regimen may have in contributing to the nutritional status of the patient.

     

Keywords

Cholesterol Zinc Osteoporosis Dementia Anemia 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Christakis
    • 1
  • Anthony Kafatos
    • 1
  1. 1.Div. Nutri., Dept. Epidem. and Publ. HealthUniv. Miami Sch. Med.MiamiUSA

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