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Terpenoids from Selected Marine Invertebrates

  • Raymond J. Andersen
  • E. Dilip de Silva
  • Eric J. Dumdei
  • Peter T. Northcote
  • Charles Pathirana
  • Mark Tischler
Part of the Recent Advances in Phytochemistry book series (RAPT, volume 24)

Abstract

Oceans cover over 70% of the surface area of the earth. They are populated by an extremely large number of plant and animal species that are uniquely marine. These marine organisms represent a vast, largely untapped, biochemical resource. During the last three decades, natural products chemists have been actively exploring this resource. They have been motivated by a practical desire to find new leads to drugs and an intellectual desire to understand the richness of nature’s biosynthetic capabilities and the role that secondary metabolites play in the biology of marine organisms.

Keywords

Marine Invertebrate Soft Coral Carbon Skeleton Polar Fraction Skin Extract 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond J. Andersen
    • 1
  • E. Dilip de Silva
    • 2
  • Eric J. Dumdei
    • 2
  • Peter T. Northcote
    • 2
  • Charles Pathirana
    • 2
  • Mark Tischler
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of OceanographyUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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